Microscopy Primer
Light and Color
Microscope Basics
Special Techniques
Digital Imaging
Confocal Microscopy
Live-Cell Imaging
Photomicrography
Microscopy Museum
Virtual Microscopy
Fluorescence
Web Resources
License Info
Image Use
Custom Photos
Partners
Site Info
Contact Us
Publications
Home

The Galleries:

Photo Gallery
Silicon Zoo
Pharmaceuticals
Chip Shots
Phytochemicals
DNA Gallery
Microscapes
Vitamins
Amino Acids
Birthstones
Religion Collection
Pesticides
BeerShots
Cocktail Collection
Screen Savers
Win Wallpaper
Mac Wallpaper
Movie Gallery

Polarized Light Microscopy Digital Image Gallery

Welded Tuff

Tuff is a porous rock formed from the widespread deposition and consolidation of volcanic ejecta. The material is quite variable, however, and can exhibit a wide range of characteristics, even in a single occurrence of the rock.

View a second image of Welded Tuff

Many large geologic formations, such as cliffs, hills, and mountains, are often composed of tuff. Within these natural structures, the rock differs significantly in constitution and hardness. In some place, for instance, the tuff may be relatively soft and crumbly, while in others it may be more compact and block-like. These differences primarily depend upon how much a tuff has been welded together. The degree of welding is determined by how hot the volcanic ash that forms a tuff was when it accumulated at the surface of the Earth; the warmer the material, the easier it is for the glass particles to weld together under the weight of overlying deposits.

Welded tuff is significantly harder than other types of tuff and can be found in various locations around the world. Also known by the term ignimbrite, the rock covers vast expanses of land in Guatemala, New Zealand, Peru, and parts of the United States. One of the most famous occurrences of welded tuff can be seen at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Created by a cataclysmic eruption more than 600,000 years ago, the huge welded tuff formation at the park is known as the Lava Creek Tuff.


BACK TO THE ROCKS AND MINERALS GALLERY

BACK TO THE POLARIZED LIGHT GALLERY

Questions or comments? Send us an email.
© 1998-2013 by Michael W. Davidson and The Florida State University. All Rights Reserved. No images, graphics, scripts, or applets may be reproduced or used in any manner without permission from the copyright holders. Use of this website means you agree to all of the Legal Terms and Conditions set forth by the owners.
This website is maintained by our
Graphics & Web Programming Team
in collaboration with Optical Microscopy at the
National High Magnetic Field Laboratory.
Last modification: Tuesday, Jul 25, 2006 at 10:34 AM
Access Count Since November 20, 2003: 9045
For more information on microscope manufacturers,
use the buttons below to navigate to their websites: