Microscopy Primer
Light and Color
Microscope Basics
Special Techniques
Digital Imaging
Confocal Microscopy
Live-Cell Imaging
Photomicrography
Microscopy Museum
Virtual Microscopy
Fluorescence
Web Resources
License Info
Image Use
Custom Photos
Partners
Site Info
Contact Us
Publications
Home

The Galleries:

Photo Gallery
Silicon Zoo
Pharmaceuticals
Chip Shots
Phytochemicals
DNA Gallery
Microscapes
Vitamins
Amino Acids
Birthstones
Religion Collection
Pesticides
BeerShots
Cocktail Collection
Screen Savers
Win Wallpaper
Mac Wallpaper
Movie Gallery

Polarized Light Microscopy Digital Image Gallery

Chinese Gray Kid Hair

Goats are ruminants that were domesticated thousands of years ago, as is evidenced by their appearance in artworks of ancient Egypt. They provide a wide array of useful commodities for humans, including milk, meat, wool, and skins.

View a second image of Chinese Gray Kid

Although classification systems vary, there are generally eight species of goats recognized, as well as six important domestic breeds. All of these domestic breeds are generally believed to have been developed from the pasang, which was likely a native of Central Asia. Relatively hardy, goats can easily inhabit lands that are considered unsuitable for sheep and cattle. Yet, unlike their popular stereotype, goats cannot survive by eating items such as tin cans and other trash. Their diet should consist of shrubs and grasses.

Goats that are not yet old enough to sexually reproduce are known as kids. These animals, which are usually less than a year in age, are often exploited for their hides, which are marketed as kid leather. Kid leather, which typically appears in black, gray, or white, is heavily utilized in the fabrication of items such as shoes and gloves. However, some kid leather does not actually derive from young goats, but rather from less valuable animals, such as rats.


BACK TO THE HAIRS GALLERY

BACK TO THE POLARIZED LIGHT GALLERY

Questions or comments? Send us an email.
© 1998-2013 by Michael W. Davidson and The Florida State University. All Rights Reserved. No images, graphics, scripts, or applets may be reproduced or used in any manner without permission from the copyright holders. Use of this website means you agree to all of the Legal Terms and Conditions set forth by the owners.
This website is maintained by our
Graphics & Web Programming Team
in collaboration with Optical Microscopy at the
National High Magnetic Field Laboratory.
Last modification: Tuesday, Jul 25, 2006 at 10:52 AM
Access Count Since November 20, 2003: 8410
For more information on microscope manufacturers,
use the buttons below to navigate to their websites: