The Intel Klamath

The Intel Klamath

Klamath was the code-name (after a river in Oregon) for a new and more powerful Pentium Processor introduced by Intel in the spring of 1997. Shortly before its debut, the microprocessor was renamed the Pentium II and was initially available with clock speeds of 233 MHz, and subsequently at a slightly higher 266 MHz. The processor sports the MMX instruction set, a larger on-chip L1 cache, and has the L2 cache wrapped into the processor single-edge-contact (SEC) package. Later Pentium II models were code-named Deschutes (also an Oregon river)and Katmai (a national park in Alaska) to represent more advanced processors that are built on higher resolution CMOS processes and run at higher clock speeds with enhanced instruction sets. The photomicrograph above illustrates the chip designers' credits surrounding the Klamath copyright notice. The initials "JSM" (James S. Miller, the project manager), just above the Klamath "h", and "JB" (Jim Bergman, fullchip design engineer) and "JSH" (Jenny S. Hernandez, fullchip mask designer) to the right of the copyright are the largest sets on the chip. Additional initials are listed in the areas surrounding the copyright notice, but they are very hard to resolve at this magnification (about 400x).


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